The 3 Things Jeremy Jones Uses To Capture His Adventures

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Every adventure both large and small deserves to be captured and saved. For some, this could be a quick snap on the summit of a local mountain. For others, it could include a full camera crew hanging out of helicopter in Alaska. One master of documentation is TGR athlete Jeremy Jones, who's about to release the pinnacle of his own documentation of snowboarding–Higher. While being documented by TGR’s production crews, Jeremy also documents his journey on a personal level. We caught up with Jeremy to ask him how he records his own adventures.

The solitude of the mountains, and the time afforded while waiting out storms, gives Jeremy time to do his best writing and drawing.

#1: A Journal. I use my journal for a lot of things. I started keeping one when I was 14 or 15, and I use it as log for the day, essentially. I try not to get caught up too much in day to day events, and simply jot down bullet points for important things. Instead, I try to focus on the mental side of things. In the mountains, I have time for reflection–life seems to become clearer. In these places, I definitely do my best writing.

In conjunction with my writing, I love to draw or paint. It is something that I have always done, and I try to bring watercolors with me whenever possible. Art is something that I have always done. I guess it is the only good grade I could get in school [laughing]. I just draw right in my journal with whatever I have: a pen, a pencil, whatever. I always draw or paint the mountains around me.

I am consumed by these places I visit. I reflect about the landscape, my inspiration, or my fears. There are definitely fears. For me, its about wrapping my head around everything. I have always kept a journal to try and work through stuff in my head and capture the mental side of snowboarding and mountaineering.

I am consumed by these places I visit. I reflect about the landscape, my inspiration, or my fears. There are definitely fears. For me, its about wrapping my head around everything. I have always kept a journal to try and work through stuff in my head and capture the mental side of snowboarding and mountaineering. The important thing is to always travel with journal. With my journal at least, anything goes.

Jeremy used his Sony point-and-shoot to scout the infamous Shangri-La spine wall during a brief window of clear skies in Nepal.

#2: A Sony 20x Optical Point and Shoot: Everyone is always asking what type of camera I take on my trips. What’s awesome about this Sony Cyber-Shot is that it has many uses.

The zoom is great, and I use it as a camera as well as binoculars. I will take a picture of a line and be able to zoom in be able to scout it. It also has really good video quality. When I went to Denali I had no cameramen, and I was able to capture the whole trip with only the camera equipment I brought.

Jer uses his Action Cam to capture those personal moments on missions like this one to the Grand Teton for Higher.

#3: A Sony Action Cam: What I really like about the Sony Action Cam is the camcorder feature. I can use it as a video journal to record my thoughts on the spot. It also has incredible audio quality. When I come back from my trips, I have a lot of “video” journal entries. A lot of the audio, video journals, and shots made it into Higher. What is great about the Action Cam is that the on-the-spot content captured adds to Higher’s narrative.

I am consumed by documenting in many different forms. All of the things I use to document a trip–whether it is writing, drawing, taking pictures, videos, whatever–all of the documentation allows me to access a special place in my brain. A place where I can reflect upon the challenges, pressures, and the enjoyment I find in the mountains. I look at my riding as my own form of art. These tools allow me to capture that special place.

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